Archive | July 2013

Happy Birthday ‘Not Just Green Fingers’ Blog

At the beginning of July 2012, I wrote and published my first ‘welcome’ post on my blog, advertising what I would be writing about in a couple of weeks time.

I had been considering writing a blog for a while, but it was Tony Wadsworth, from Radio Leicester, that gave me the ‘push’ I needed to actually start writing and he has supported me ever since.  So thank you Tony for your continued support.

I always loved reading blogs but I just couldn’t find a ‘simple living’ blog in the UK that included the things I was interested in.  I decided I would write about how we live in an ordinary street, in a 1930’s semi-detached house in Leicester, UK and how I grow organic fruit and vegetables on my four allotment plots.

Over the last year I have also written how I cook from scratch, make bread, jams, pickles, chutneys and apple juice, etc. and also how I clean the old fashioned way using vinegar, lemon juice and bi-carb.

I learnt my frugal, thrifty ways through necessity and the desire to make sure my family did not feel deprived in anyway and I really wanted to share this information with others, in the hope that in a small way it would help people in a similar situation.

My very first post was published on the 23rd July 2012 and was titled ‘Organic Tomatoes and Comfrey Tea’.  Since then I have written nearly two hundred posts and amazingly I have had over 69,000 ‘hits’ from all over the world.  I really never thought that people would be interested in what I write, so I am really pleased and humbled by this.

Slowly over the year, people have also begun to leave comments on my blog and I love this part of blogging the most.  I have noticed that some of my readers have even started to reply to each other via their own comments, which is absolutely wonderful.  I now regularly have new people reading and commenting on my blog for the first time and I am always so pleased to hear from them.  I also have my loyal supporters that have been commenting for a long time and I am so very grateful to you, for your continued support.

As it’s the start of my daughters school summer holidays, I have decided to take a couple of weeks off from blogging, so I can spend some quality time with my family, though I will be still be around to read and reply to your comments.

In the mean time I would like to say a big ‘thank you’ for reading my blog and your continued support and I am leaving you with a slideshow of my allotment at the moment. I hope you enjoy it.

I will be back in two weeks’ time, on Monday 5th August.

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A Lavender Lemonade And A Lavender Fairy Cake Recipe

My lavender hedges that line my two paths either side of my plot, are flowering beautifully at the moment.  The variety is ‘Munstead’, which is an old english variety.

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The bees and butterflies are loving the flowers and I didn’t have to wait for long to take a photograph of the butterfly below:

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Lavender is a herb which has been documented for use for over 2500 years.  It was used by ancient Egyptians for mummification and perfume.

Lavender has a calming effect and can aid sleep.

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Using Lavender:

I think it is really important to make use of everything that our garden gives to us.

This week I picked some bunches of lavender and hung them in my kitchen to dry out. It’s best to pick lavender in the late morning after all the morning dew has evaporated.

I am hoping to use the dried flowers for my christmas hampers, but I’m not sure yet what exactly I will do with them.

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Lavender flowers are perfectly edible provided that you are 100% sure they haven’t been sprayed with harmful chemicals.   I always give them a quick wash under a cold tap before I use them.

 As my lavender is flowering so beautifully at my allotment, I decided to make some Lavender Cakes and Lavender Lemonade.

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Lavender Cakes

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2 tablespoons of lavender flowers

125g Self raising flour

125g Caster sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

125g margarine or softened butter

2 eggs

A drop of milk

Icing sugar and more lavender flowers to decorate.

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Put the lavender flowers, flour and sugar in a blender and grind the flowers for a little bit.  Sieve it all into another bowl discarding the left over bits of lavender.

Add baking powder, eggs and margarine and beat until combined.

Add a drop of milk until the right consistancy is reached (i.e. drops off the spoon easily).

Half fill cake cases with the mixture and then bake for approximately 15 minutes at gas mark 5 / 375F / 190C

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When the cakes have cooled, decorate with white icing and a bit of lavender.

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The cakes taste really nice as they don’t have an overpowering lavender taste, just a ‘hint’ of it and they are a bit of a novelty if you have friends round for ‘afternoon tea’.

I do choose to take the lavender off the top of the cakes before I eat them, as I find this tastes too strong for me.  You may think differently, please let me know if you do.

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My next recipe is for a thirst quenching Lavender Lemonade, which is my eldest daughters favourite drink.

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Lavender Lemonade

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870ml water

2 tablespoons of lavender flowers

100g granulated sugar

120ml lemon juice

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Put approximately a third of the water into a pan and bring it to the boil

Pour the boiling water over the lavender flowers and leave to ‘steep’ for ten minutes.

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Strain the water and add it to the pan again.

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Add the rest of the water, sugar and lemon juice and bring back to the boil, stirring continuously.

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When it has boiled, take off the heat and chill.

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Dilute the lavender lemonade with water to your taste.

I added ice cubes with borage frozen inside them for an extra pretty twist.

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I hope you have enjoyed reading my post today.

I will be back on Friday at 4pm.  I hope you will join me then.

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Fruit, Fruit And More Fruit

The weather has been wonderful this week, which has made it quite difficult to work down at the allotment as most days it has been too hot to do anything….but I’m certainly not complaining.

One of my two lavender hedges that line my two paths

One of my two lavender hedges that line my two paths

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I have hoed a little bit this week and tied my outdoor cucumbers up.   I also tied my tomato plants up and continued to ‘nip’ off their side shoots.  I gave them a good water with my homemade comfrey feed too, as the first little tomatoes are forming on each plant.  If the weather stays like this for a while, it will keep the dreaded ‘blight’ away and just maybe we will get a good crop.

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I noticed the outdoor grapes vines that I planted last year are beginning to take shape.  I am training them on a post and wire support:

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I also noticed my first little patty pans are growing and my first courgette.  I always get excited when I spot my first courgette of the year, even though I know I will be fed up with them when so many follow afterwards.

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The flowers on my plot are doing well now and I have noticed that my calendulas are beginning to flower in ‘calendula alley’ next to my polytunnel (I call it this as it is the path I use to get to my fruit trees and it was also covered in beautiful calendula’s last year).

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My sweet peas are growing well too, but my dad’s are looking even nicer in his patch at the front of my allotment:

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My wild flowers are doing well and are a hive of activity with all the bees and insects buzzing around.

My neighbour has kindly let me take a photograph of his wildflowers, to show you all.  It is the first time he has grown a wildflower patch and I think they are looking really beautiful….if you are reading this Julian, you should be proud of it.  It’s great to know we are helping the bee population at our allotment site.  I hope more people follow suit:

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Most of this week has been spent picking the fruit and vegetables I have grown.  In fact, my thumbs now hurt from shelling all the peas and broad beans.    It really seems to be is a bumper year so far, even though things are a little late coming.

I am finding that after a long wait, the fruit all seems to be coming at once!

I’m still picking strawberries and we have all eaten so many over the last two weeks that my whole family must have a ‘strawberry glow’.  I have given lots away and also made my first lot of strawberry jam of the summer this week, which i have been sharing with my allotment friends.

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I picked my last lot of rhubarb for this year.  It’s best to stop picking rhubarb at the beginning of July so it can build up its energy stores after this, ready for winter.

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This week I found my white currants and red currants were also ready to pick.  I also found a few black currants ready to pick too.

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I’ve got to say, I really hate picking and preparing currants, as they are so fiddly and I hate pulling the little green stalks out, but my daughters love them so it is all worthwhile.

I froze most of the currants by ‘open freezing’ on a tray before putting them into a bag when they were frozen.  I’ve got to say that when they were frozen, they looked like little jewels glistening on my tray.  They looked too good to eat.

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I’m starting to harvest my raspberries this week, but I think I ate more than I actually picked as I really love them:

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Also this week I found my gooseberries were ready, so I picked all of these too.  You can see them in the smaller basket at the bottom of the photo:

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We have been eating so many of the fruit and vegetables that I picked this week, but I am also freezing the surplus ready for the long, cold winter.  During these bleak and dreary days I use the fruit to make pies, crumbles, jams, jellies cordials etc. and it’s lovely to be reminded of summer again when it’s cold outside.

I didn’t quite realise how many bags of fruit and vegetables that I had frozen this week, until I looked yesterday.  I have three bags of broad beans, 1½ bags of peas, a small bag of mangetout, one bag of rhubarb, one bag of gooseberries, one bag of mixed currants and an astounding eight bags of strawberries!…but I am confident it will all get used before next summer, it’s a good job we have three freezers.

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Gooseberries are a fruit that I used to eat like cherries when I was a child (just like my daughters still do), but now I can’t eat them unless they are cooked as my taste must have changed over the years.

A lovely way to use gooseberries is to make a gooseberry fool.  It is a very easy recipe (I only post easy / simple recipes on my blog) and it tastes absolutely delicious.

If you need to look back at this recipe, or any other recipe, just click the word ‘recipe’ at the top of my blog and all my recipes will appear listed on a page, ready for you to ‘click’ on for easy access.

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A Gooseberry Fool Recipe

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2 large handfuls of gooseberries (washed, topped and tailed)

5 or 6 digestive biscuits

150g low fat Greek yoghurt

90 ml double cream

1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 tablespoon of caster sugar

A little bit of grated chocolate to serve.

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Put the gooseberries and granulated sugar into a saucepan.

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Cook over a low heat for approximately five minutes, stirring all the time, until the mixture thickens.

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Chill the sugar and gooseberry mix in the fridge for about an hour.

Whip the cream and caster sugar until it just holds the ‘peaks’ when you take your whisk out.

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Fold in the Greek yoghurt and gooseberry sugar mix.

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Crush the digestive biscuits in a bag, by bashing with a rolling pin.

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Put the biscuit crumbs into the bottom of four small dishes.

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Top the biscuit crumbs with the gooseberry mix.

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Leave the dishes in the fridge for a couple of hours to chill.

Just before serving, grate a little chocolate over the top for show.

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Enjoy!

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Thank you for reading my blog today.

I will be back on Monday at 4pm.  Have a good weekend and enjoy the good weather!

How To Make Strawberry Jam & Jam Making Tips

This week I was astonished to find see that strawberries are £2.00 for a 400 gram  punnet (or £2.50 for a 300 gram punnet of organic strawberries).  It’s a long time since I have bought strawberries and I didn’t realise they are so expensive and I would like to bet they don’t taste half as nice as homegrown ones, as shop bought strawberries are usually grown for their ‘long shelf life’ rather than taste.

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If you read my post on Friday, you will know that I am having a bumper crop of strawberries this year.

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We have been eating them on their own, or with yoghurt, or with a sprinkling of sugar and my youngest daughter has even been dipping them into melted chocolate.  They are delicious.

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I have also frozen lots of them, by laying the washed and hulled strawberries on a tray and then freezing them.  When they are frozen I put the strawberries into bags.  This way, they don’t all stick together and it is easy to just pick a few out of the bag when I need them.

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I use the frozen strawberries to make cordials, pies etc and my daughters like them in fruit salads (though they do go a bit mushy when they are defrosted).

I also use them to make jams for the christmas hampers that I give away to my family:

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Over the weekend I made another batch of strawberry jam for my daughter, as it’s her favourite.

Strawberries are quite low in pectin and pectin helps the jam to set.  I normally remedy this by just adding a tablespoon or two of lemon juice to my jam, as this is high in pectin and helps it to set.  However, I thought I would try an experiment this time, to find out if  ‘Jam Sugar’ with the pectin already added, would make a better jam, as lots of recipes recommend you to use this:

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So this is how I made the jam with the jam sugar:

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Strawberry Jam Using Jam Sugar:

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2 kg Strawberries

2 kg Jam Sugar

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Before I started, I put some side plates into the freezer for a few hours.  I used these later to test for the ‘setting point’

I washed and hulled the strawberries

I put the strawberries and jam sugar into a large pan (the contents rise as it boils)

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I put the pan onto a low heat and stirred comtinuously with a wooden spoon.

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I continued stirring until the sugar melted and I couldn’t see any sugar crystals on the back of my spoon

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At this point I turned the heat right up and boiling hard.  I always find that jam burns at the bottom of my pan if I just leave it to boil,  so I stir the jam continuously, though other recipes don’t tell you to do this.

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After approximately 5 minutes of boiling I tested for the ‘setting point’.  To do this, I put a small drop of jam on one of the side plates from the freezer.  After a few moments, I push the jam with my finger and if it wrinkles it’s ready.  If it doesn’t wrinkle, I continue to boil the jam.

I usually keep checking the jam every five minutes until the setting point is reached.

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When the setting point was reached I took the pan off the heat and stirred in a knob of butter to reduce the skum off the top of the jam.  I then left it for fifteen minutes, which helps to stop the strawberries from dropping to the bottom of the jars.

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While I was waiting I sterilised eight jam jars by placing them in my oven, gas mark 4 for 5 minutes.

I poured the jam into the jars and sealed them with the lids.  I used jars that have a sealable lid (i.e. the jars that jam is sold in, at the supermarket).  This way I don’t need to worry about wax discs to create a seal.  As the jam cools, the lids ‘pop’ down and make you jump.

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I managed to make eight jars out of the ingredients and the jam sugar was £1.99 per kg.  This worked out at just under 50p per jar, which is still cheaper than shop bought jam, however if I had used ordinary granualted sugar and lemon juice, the jars would have worked out at 25p per jar.

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My Review Of Jam Sugar

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So did the jam set better?….

When I was making the jam, it reached setting point far quicker than my method of using granulated sugar and lemon juice.

When I used the jam, was it any better?

Unfortunately the answer is “No”, it was the same as my jam.

Would I buy and use Jam Sugar again?

No, I don’t think it is worth the money.  Please let me know your thoughts on this.

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My Tips For Jam Making:

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Just to let you know, the pan I use to make jam is a ‘maslin’ pan which is deep enough for jam making.  Mine was second hand, which I purchased for £10 from ebay and it was worth every penny.

Jam making is easy once you have got the hang of it.  If you haven’t made jam before, I have written some tips below to help you:

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Clean equipment – Always use equipment that is scupulously clean and jars that have been sterilised.

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Fruit – Always use undamaged fruit. Fruit with too much damage will spoil the result and the jam is likely to deteriorate quickly.

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Pectin – Jams, jellies and marmalade set because of pectin. Pectin occurs naturally in fruit and when cooked with sugar the naturally occurring acid in the fruit, thickens and sets the preserve. Citrus fruit, blackberries, apples and redcurrants have high pectin levels. Soft fruits such as strawberries have a lower pectin level. If fruits are low in pectin then you can add fruits with a higher level of pectin to it or just add a few squeezes of lemon juice which will help them to set. When possible use slightly under ripe fruit when pectin levels will be at the highest.

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Sugar – I use granulated but you can use preserving sugar, but it is more expensive. Preserving sugar will help set low-pectin fruits, but I just add lemon juice to granulated sugar, which does the same job.

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Quantity – Don’t make too large a quantity at one time. Large volumes of fruit and sugar will take a long time to reach setting point, causing the fruit to break up and eventually dissolve in the jam.

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To test for the setting point – Place a few small plates or saucers in to your freezer for a while before you start to make jam, so they are really cold.  Pour a small drop of the hot jam on to the plate and wait a few moments. Push the edges of the jam with your index finger and if the jam wrinkles then the setting point has been reached.  If it’s not set, continue to boil it and check again in 5 minutes. Don’t overcook. It is tempting to keep cooking to achieve a firmer set. A slightly looser jam is preferable to one that tastes burnt or where the fruit has dissolved.  Don’t worry if you didn’t judge your jam setting point correctly and it’s runny, just call it a ‘preserve’ instead.

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Scum – There is always a little bit of scum on the jam after the setting point has been reached.  Skim it off with a ladle or add a tiny knob of butter and stir. This will dissolve the scum almost instantly.

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Leave the jam to settle – Always leave the jam for 15 mins away from the heat, once the setting point has been reached.  This will prevent the fruit from rising to the surface of the jar when you pour it in.

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I hope you have enjoyed reading my blog today.

I will be back on Friday at my usual time of 4pm.  Have a good week.

Completing Planting And A Bumper Harvest

I have so much to write about today, as I have been working so hard at my allotment this week.  I wanted to finish planting all my crops before the long school holidays begin, in exactly one weeks time.  The schools here in Leicestershire break up earlier than the rest of the country.

I started by planted some more perpetual spinach:

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….And some more spring onions.  I sow my spring onions in modules as I always had a very bad germination rate when I sowed them straight into the ground (though I don’t know why as they are supposed to be an easy plant to grow).  By sowing a few seeds in each module, I find it almost guarantees a high germination rate.  I don’t thin the spring onions either, I just plant them as they are when they are ready:

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In the right hand photograph above, you can just see the newly planted spring onions and you can see the ones I planted out three or four weeks ago growing nicely behind.

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I also planted out my spring broccoli, curly kale and some more khol rabi.  All of the brassicas were planted in firm soil which I had dug and manured last autumn.  I also walked over the area before planting.

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As the ground was dry when I planted the brassicas out, I dug a hole for each plant and filled it with water.  When the water had drained away, I then planted them.  This allows the water to go deep into the ground to encourage the roots to also grow deep to find the water.  It also helps to stop the water from evaporating quickly after planting.

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I also planted some quick growing turnips too, but you may have to enlarge the photograph below to see them:

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All my brassicas have nets over, to stop the dreaded pigeons eating them.

While I was working in my brassica patch, I removed any yellowing leaves from my remaining spring cabbages. This will help to stop the build up of any pests or diseases lurking in them.  These cabbages were planted a month after my first spring cabbages and they are now starting to heart up nicely, so I will start to use these now.

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I have now officially ran out of room in my brassica beds and so I can finally say I have finished my summer brassica planting:

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This week I cut my comfrey down.  I prefer to cut my comfrey down before it flowers, but I just wasn’t quick enough this month.  If you have been reading regularly, you will know that I have already made comfrey tea this year (which incidentally is a wonderful high potash fertiliser used for all fruit and flowers e.g. it is a great tomato feed).  You can read how to make comfrey tea here.

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I have also added a vast amount of comfrey to my compost bins already this year.  So when I cut it down at this time of the year, I lay it down between my main crop potatoes instead.  This acts as a mulch to help to stop water evapourating from the ground and also helps to stop annual weeds from germinating.  When the comfrey breaks down, I just dig it into the ground to add nutrients to the soil.

I think comfrey is a wonderful plant!

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This week  I also cleared my old perpetual spinach that had ran to seed and planted my french beans in it’s place:

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I cleared my broad beans in my polytunnel that had finished producing beans:

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And I cleared my poached egg plants that had finally finished flowering either side of my path.  I transplanted some self seeded calendula plants in it’s place, though it looks quite bare at the moment it will soon grow and look pretty and be a bonus for the bees:

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Another thing I have started to do is to ‘nip’ the tops of my runnerbeans off as they reach the top of their supports.  This helps the plants to ‘bush out’ further down and produce more beans:

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This week’s harvest:

Plants have been growing slowly due to the cold spring we have had.  However, the plants are finally now producing and I seem to be having a bumper harvest.

I’ve started to pick my outdoor broadbeans this week and I have needed to pick them every other day:

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I have found my peas are just great, even though they a month behind.  My back has ached just picking them:

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So too is the mangetout (even though some are a little larger than I would have liked, as I didn’t notice they were ready):

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My potatoes taste delicious (especially with a knob of butter) and we are eating lots of lettuces, watercress and spring onions….I love summer so much.

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And my strawberries…well what can I say other than it really is a bumper crop and I’m picking carrier bags full every two days:

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Of course the down side is that I had to defrost my freezer ready for all the fruit and vegetables that I have been bringing home….

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.,….but it will be worth it when we are still tasting ‘summer’ in the long cold winter months.

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I hope you enjoyed reading my blog today.

I will be back on Monday with some Jam making tips.

Hope you have a good weekend.

What To Do In The Kitchen Garden In July.

When I first started to grow vegetables I really needed the information to be in one place, so I could look it up easily. However, I found I had to search for lots of little bits of information, scattered between internet sites and books. It used to take me a long time to find the information I needed.

I thought it would be useful to have this information altogether in one place. So for the benefit of UK gardeners, I write a list of things to be done each month and any useful information I can think of.

It is worth remembering that different parts of the UK have different weather conditions e.g. the last frost is expected earlier in the south than the north.

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July

Traditionally, July is often the warmest month of the year and days are long, but it can also be the wettest month of summer with thunderstorms probable in all areas.  Though as we know, weather patterns are changing and as gardeners, we really don’t know what to expect these days.

There are lots of things to harvest at this time of the year and your hard work preparing the soil, sowing seeds, etc. will have started to pay off.

It must be noted though, it has been very cold lately and this years plants are a few weeks further behind than normal, therefore please remember that this is a general guide.

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Vegetables and salads to harvest:

Broad beans, spinach beet and chard, peas, globe artichokes, kohl rabi, broccoli, calabrese, onions, shallots, garlic, beetroot, early potatoes, turnips, carrots and florence fennel.  Oriental mustards, spinach, peas, mangetout, beetroot, runner beans, french beans, courgettes, marrows and patty pans. Aubergines, chillies, peppers.  Lettuces, radishes, mixed salad leaves and spring onions, tomatoes, chicory, celery, cucumbers, rocket, watercress and spring onions.

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Fruit to harvest:

Rhubarb (finish picking at the beginning of July), gooseberries, strawberries, blueberries, cherries, red and white currants, early plums, apricots, raspberries, peaches, nectarines and undercover melons.  You may even be able to harvest early blackberries, logan berries and tayberries.

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Vegetables and salads to sow:

Sprouting broccoli and calabrese, beetroot, french beans, turnips, carrots, kale, kohl rabi, peas (at the beginning of the month), perpetual spinach, fennel and swiss chard, spring cabbages, oriental leaves, winter radish.

Lettuces and salad leaves (though they are harder to germinate in hot weather), rocket, spring onions, chicory, endive, radishes, watercress.

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Things to plant:

Brussel sprouts, autumn cauliflowers, winter cabbages, sprouting broccoli, kale, peas, french beans, fennel, endive and leeks.

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Jobs to do in July:

Keep weeding and mulch with compost or even grass cuttings if the ground is damp. Mulching will suppress the weeds and help to keep the soil moist.

Water if it is dry. It is better to give a ‘good’ watering once a week, rather than water a small amount daily, as this will help the plant roots to grow deeper to find water.

When your peas or beans have stopped producing, cut down the foliage leaving the roots in the ground, as these have lots of nitrogen in their modules, which will be good for your next crops.

Feed tomatoes after the first little tomato starts to form. Use a high potash feed, a comfrey feed is perfect for this. See how to make a comfrey feed here.

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Remove new raspberry suckers or shoots that are unwanted. If your canes become too thick and dense it stops the sunlight and air from getting to the inside canes, which can cause disease or under-developed fruit.

Continue pruning the side shoots on grape vines and thin out fruit so the remaining fruit will grow larger.  Remove some of the foliage if necessary to expose the grapes to the sun to help with ripening.

Keep tying in blackberry canes.

Keep pinching off the sideshoots on your tomatoes.

Prune summer raspberries as soon as they have finished fruiting, by cutting down all the canes that have had fruit on, to the ground.  Tie in all this years new growth, as these canes will have the fruit on next year.

Thin apples and pears if they are still overcrowed, so the remaining fruit will grow larger.

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Propagate strawberries by pegging down the runners, so they root into the ground.  Alternatively, you can peg them down into pots of compost.

Prune cherry and plum trees.

‘Pinch out’ the top of runner beans when they reach the top of their supports.  This will encourage bushier plants and stops them from becoming top heavy.

Weed regularly so your plants won’t need to compete with the weeds for water and nutrients.

Take up onions, garlic and shallots and lay them in the sun.  Alternatively, lift them and dry them in a greenhouse.  Ensure they are fully dry before storing them.

Feed peppers after the first little pepper starts to form. Use a high potash feed, the comfrey feed is perfect for this (see above).

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If it is dry, water cauliflowers, lettuces, rocket, spinach as these have a tendency to bolt in dry weather.

Earth up trench celery to stop the light getting to the stems.

Bend the leaves of cauliflowers over the curds to stop the sun from turning them yellow.

Take cutting of herbs now.

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July pests and diseases:

(Please don’t be alarmed by all the pests and diseases that you read below, you may never see some of them, but it’s good to be aware).

Protect your brassicas, peas, strawberries and even lettuces from pigeons, by keeping them netted.

Slugs and snails are active at night, especially in damp weather.

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Remove any yellow leaves from brassicas to stop pests from hiding in them or diseases from spreading.  Check brassicas for caterpillars and pick them off or squash them.

Watch out for blackfly, they especially love globe artichokes, runner beans, french beans and beetroot.  Wipe the blackfly between your fingers and thumb to squash them.

Watch out for ‘blight’, it will affect your potatoes and tomatoes.  Blight is a fungal disease, spread by wind and rain and it can wipe out your whole crop in just a few days.  There is information regarding blight here.

Look out for leek moth caterpillars which feed on the leaves leaving holes in the foliage.  Pick them off asap.

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Check for asparagus beetles and pick them off.

Check apple for canker, scab and powdery mildew.

Check pears for pear leaf blister mite, rust, canker and scab.

Check gooseberries and currants for saw flies, greenflies and currant blister aphids.

Check grapes for scale insects.

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Thank you for reading my blog today, I hope this post will be useful.

I will be back as usual on Friday at 4pm. I hope you have a good week.