My Wildflower Patch – Four Months Of Flowers

My wildflower patch has finally given up flowering.  For four months solid, it flowered beautifully, for the price of a few packets of seed.  I am so very proud of it, especially as it’s my first attempt at growing wildflowers.

As it’s cold and miserable outside, I thought it would be nice to show you a slide show of the four months of my wild flowers, so we can dream of summer again.  They flowered from the middle of June until the middle of October, which is four months!  I certainly got my money’s worth out of those seeds.  I find this incredible and the whole time they were full of beneficial insects.

I planted my wildflower patch after I was inspired by Sarah Raven’s television program called  ‘Bees, butterflies and Blooms’.

Sarah Raven explained how 98% of Britain’s wildflower meadows and grass lands have been lost and how the world’s bees and other pollinating insects are in crisis and without these pollinators our future food security is under threat.   Her mission was to encourage farmers and village communities to help recreate a network of habitats for struggling bees, butterflies and pollinating insects.

I was blown away by the beauty of the wildflowers that she showed on her program and I wasn’t the only one to feel this way either.  In fact, the designers of the 10 football fields-worth of wildflowers, at this years Olympics, were influenced by Sarah Raven’s TV program.  Also, wildflowers sales have apparently tripled this year.

You can read how I grew them from seed here and here.

After seeing my wildflower patch and learning how easy it is to maintain the flowers (I virtually did nothing to them after I had sowed the seeds), I can’t understand why councils don’t use wildflowers more.  Councils tend to plant row after row of expensive carpet bedding, in the middle of roundabouts and parks, but if they sowed wildflowers instead, surely this would reduce maintenence costs for them and they would still look stunning, if not better.  There is also the advantage of the wildlife they attract due to the flowers.  I can’t remember a day that my small patch wasn’t full of bees, butterflies and insects of all kinds….this just doesn’t happen with row after row of carpet bedding plants, that have been bred to have double flowers for beauty, but no pollen for insects.

Next year, if you see an area of carpet bedding, please stop and watch to see if there is any insect activity and I’m sure you will be surprised, as I was when it was first pointed out to me.

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I hope you enjoy the slideshow.

Click once on the top left picture and it will start a slide show for you.

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I hope you enjoyed reading my blog today.

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10 thoughts on “My Wildflower Patch – Four Months Of Flowers

  1. Wild flowers look amazing, when on our holidays this year we noticed for the first time that cromer had made wildflower borders instead of carpet bedding, there were insects buzzing all around.
    sue

  2. Beautiful slideshow! I watched that program too. Leeds was featured on it. Next year I will go and hunt those urban areas out where they planted and take some photos. I am really passionate about wild flowers and the plight of the bees. So I just love what you’ve done. I have a crazy idea to sprinkle wildflower seeds onto the meadows at the back of my house next year!! I’d need a hell of a lot of seeds but it would be incredible if they germinated and made what is quite a bland grassy meadow into an amazing wildflower meadow! Lovely post Mrs Thrift 🙂

    • Hi Simon, thanks for reading my blog. I loved growing the wildflowers as it was so easy and I would just stand and stare most days, at all the beneficial insects that would be buzzing around them, it was great. I will be posting more information in the new year about my allotment and what I have been growing or planning to grow there in the coming year. I’m certainly missing my allotment as the weather is so wet that I can’t get on my soil.

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